Tag Archives: #NavyMedicine

Building Corpsmen Culture: The Early Years of the Hospital Corps School

By André B. Sobocinski, Historian, BUMED Students at the Hospital Corps School Newport, ca 1914 For almost as long as there has been a Hospital Corps there has existed a school charged with imparting the values, traditions and requisite tools to prospective corpsmen.  On June 18, 1914, the Navy established the Hospital Corps School at the Naval Training Station in …

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TMINM: Naval Hygiene in the Age of Epidemics

By André B. Sobocinski, Historian, BUMED *** The Navy’s South Atlantic Squadron arrived in Rio de Janeiro in 1894 just as a deadly disease epidemic hit the city.   To protect the crews, the shipboard surgeons—immersed in the principles of naval hygiene—issued a series of strict sanitary guidelines.  For months the Squadron remained in port and yet almost entirely free of …

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I am Navy Medicine, Capt. Andrea Donalty, chief medical officer at NMRTC Bremerton

For Capt. Andrea Donalty, chief medical officer (CMO) and general pediatrician at Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Bremerton, every day is National Women’s Physician Day. Although Feb. 3, 2020 was the nationally chosen date to recognize female physicians and respect Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to receive a medical degree in the U.S. in 1949, female physicians such …

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I Am Navy Medicine: Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Erin Shelly-Moody

Story by Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan Riley In an all-hands message, Capt. Shannon Johnson, Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command (NMRTC) Bremerton Commanding Officer, announced that Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Erin Shelly-Moody had been selected as the hospital’s Sailor of the Quarter for the first quarter. “I am confident that you will continue the hard work and superior performance,” wrote …

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Remembering Navy Medicine in the Balkan Crisis

By Rear Adm. James A. Johnson, Jr., Medical Corps, U.S. Navy, Retired Editor’s Note.   In the years following Josip Tito’s[i] death the tenuous confederation of states known as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia disintegrated under the strain of ethnic nationalism.  Serbs, Croats, and Slovenians—Catholics, Orthodox Christians and Muslims— each fought to establish their own geographic borders based on their …

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