Tag Archives: Navy

Navy Surgeon General Travel Log: Guam and Hawaii

Shipmates, Last week, I traveled with Force Master Chief Terry Prince to Guam and Hawaii. Here are several trip highlights: On day one in Guam, I met with over a dozen ombudsmen representing several commands as an opportunity to hear directly from the families we serve. The next day, I met with Rear Adm. Shoshana Chatfield, commander, Joint Region Marianas …

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Navy Surgeon General Opening Remarks To Senate Appropriations Committee – Defense

Vice Adm. Forrest Faison, Navy surgeon general and chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery provided the following opening remarks to the Senate Appropriations Committee Defense subcommittee during a hearing on defense health programs and military medicine funding March 29. Chairman Cochran, Vice Chairman Durbin, distinguished members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to update you on Navy Medicine. We value your important oversight …

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Navy Medicine in Focus: February 2017

Every day, more than 63,000 Navy Medicine personnel are operating forward around the world, providing agile, rapid health care support to the Navy and Marine Corps. Ensuring lives are saved wherever our forces operate is what we do, be it above the sea, on the sea, below the sea or on the battlefield. The following photos depict our medical professionals at work during February …

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Navy Surgeon General Travel Log: San Antonio

Shipmates, Last week, I had the opportunity to visit San Antonio, also known as ‘Military City USA’, alongside Force Master Chief Terry Prince. Here are some highlights from my trip: I first met with Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Johnson, commanding general, Brooke Army Medical Center to discuss readiness and partnerships, which are two main priorities in my Commander’s Guidance. I also …

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Five Facts about African-Americans in Navy Medicine

By Andre Sobocinski, Historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery African-Americans were among the first Sailors to serve as loblolly boys (precursors of today’s hospital corpsmen). Among these first medical Sailors was Joseph Anderson, a 16-year-old loblolly boy who served aboard the schooner USS Eagle in 1800.   On  July 26, 1943 the first class of African-Americans entered Hospital …

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