Tag Archives: Navy Medical Department

A Look Back: Navy Medicine in 1914

By Andre Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery As the twentieth century’s first “Great War” erupted on the European stage the United States held to a policy of “strict neutrality” under President Woodrow Wilson. In 1914, the American population numbered 99, 111,000 people across 48 states. The year was marked by many “firsts” in this country including …

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Navy Medicine Presents “The Grog”

By Andre Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery It is with great pleasure that we offer you the latest “ration” of The Grog, A Journal of Navy Medical History and Culture. In this edition, we look back at the U.S. Navy’s long history with sharks–from curious cases of shark attacks documented by Navy physicians to the development …

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Navy Medicine Highlights First African-Americans in the Navy Medical Department

By Andre Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery From the dawn of the U.S Navy, African-Americans have played a vital role in its history and have embodied the basic tenets of service and commitment to duty. At the same time, the African-American experience in Navy history is a story about breaking barriers, living through a segregated service, …

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A Look Back: Navy Medicine in 1913

By Andre Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Much has changed over the past 100 years in not only the United States, but in Navy Medicine as well.  Here’s a look back 100 years ago.  In 1913, the U.S. population had reached 97,225,000 and stretched across 48 states with the additions of Arizona and New Mexico into the Union. …

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