A Look Back

10 Notable Moments for Women in Navy Medicine

Editor’s note: Although this blog honors several individuals, there are thousands of remarkable women who contribute to the Navy Medicine mission and continue to make an impact every day. 1942: Navy nurse superintendent Sue Dauser is the first woman in the Navy to serve as a captain. She received her commission in the Navy on Oct. 16, 1917.   Feb. 1, 1943: First female hospital …

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Remembering the War Dispensary, the Forerunner of Naval Medical Center San Diego

By André B. Sobocinski, historian, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Editor’s note: 2017 marks the centennial of Navy Medicine in San Diego. The following blog commemorates this historical milestone. One-hundred years ago, the U.S. Navy moved to the vacated grounds of the Panama-California Exposition in Balboa Park to establish a training camp for Sailors destined for the “Great War.”(1) Amidst …

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Five Facts about African-Americans in Navy Medicine

By Andre Sobocinski, Historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery African-Americans were among the first Sailors to serve as loblolly boys (precursors of today’s hospital corpsmen). Among these first medical Sailors was Joseph Anderson, a 16-year-old loblolly boy who served aboard the schooner USS Eagle in 1800.   On  July 26, 1943 the first class of African-Americans entered Hospital …

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The Mosquito Fighters: A Short History of Mosquitoes in the Navy – Part 3

By André B. Sobocinski, historian, BUMED “Dryness, coolness, fresh air, sunshine, cleanliness of body, clothes and bedding, good food, pure water, temperance, refreshing sleep, occupation exercise, cheerfulness, and contentment of mind…” ~A Recipe for Good Health by Medical Inspector Albert Gihon, USN, 1871 For much of the nineteenth century the United States was losing a war to an overlooked threat. …

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The Mosquito Fighters: A Short History of Mosquitoes in the Navy – Part 2

By André B. Sobocinski, historian, BUMED When you … arrive at Thompson’s Island you will investigate with utmost care the origins, progress and present state of the sickness which prevails on the island and in the Squadron.” ~Secretary of the Navy Samuel Southard to Commodore John Rodgers, October 1823 W hen the United States acquired the Spanish colony of Florida …

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