Marines

Pre-Service Trauma: A Case Study

Lt. Ashley Clark, OSCAR Psychologist, 1st Marine Division Editors Note: Clark is currently serving as the first female OSCAR psychologist. Perhaps one of the greatest advantages in embedded psychology is the flexibility for creative treatment planning. Recently, a Marine PFC was referred to me by his battalion surgeon after he was observed shaking, crying, and likely having a flashback on the …

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Invictus Games 2014: A Medical Perspective

By Cmdr. John Biery, senior medical advisor, Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor I had the incredible honor of supporting the wounded warrior athletes participating in the Invictus Games in London this past September.  It was the first-ever international adaptive athletics competition for wounded, ill or injured service members from 13 countries – from Afghanistan, to Germany, to New Zealand. …

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 Expressions of Gratitude Go a Long Way

 By Lt. Jay Morrison, Naval Hospital Guam As we move through suicide prevention month, we’re reminded of the important warning signs to watch for in our shipmates, and to spot signs of trouble: increased substance use, withdrawal, recklessness, changes in mood or personality, and especially expressions of hopelessness or wishes to die. We’ve heightened our sensitivity to shipmates who feel alienated, …

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Off to see the Wizard

By Carrie H. Kennedy, group psychologist, Marine Corps Embassy Security Group Editor’s Note: Reprinted from American Psychological Association Division 19, The Military Psychologist. http://www.apadivisions.org/division-19/publications/newsletters/military/2014/07/wizard.aspx Over the years I have observed many creative terms for military psychologists. Some are funny and adapted to the way the military names everyone. Psych-O is a good depiction of this. On Navy ships the titles of …

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Serving our Wounded, Ill and Injured

By Cmdr. Amy Drayton, RN, MPH, MSN, director of Population Health, Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center Sailors and Marines who answer the call of duty to protect our nation’s freedom often risk illness and injury during their service, sometimes returning from war with complicated burdens of physical and psychological injuries. We, at the Navy and Marine Corps Public …

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