Force health and safety

The Science Behind the Flu Vaccine

By Cmdr. Gary Brice, Director for Operational Infectious Diseases, Naval Health Research Center Fever. Chills. Headaches and body aches. Getting the flu isn’t fun and it can lay low even the healthiest individual. That’s why every year, starting in August, there’s a call throughout the military for personnel to get their flu vaccination—it is currently the best protection against the …

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The War on Tobacco is an All Hands Fight

By Force Master Chief (FMF/SW/AW) Terry J. Prince, director of the Hospital Corps A tobacco-free force is vital to the readiness and well-being of the entire Navy and Marine Corps team. Tobacco reduces the capability of our service members and detracts from overall resiliency. Tobacco is also addictive and takes a serious toll on your health. Smoking, chewing, vaping or …

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‘Young enough to not die from smoking’

By Rear Adm. John Fuller, commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific Hawaii is making it easier for smokers to quit. Beginning January 1, 2016 it will be against the law in this state for anyone under 21 to buy or use tobacco products, including electronic nicotine delivery devices. Quitting tobacco is one of the best things …

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Fall is back, so is flu season; Navy Medicine is ready, are you?

Let’s face it, getting the flu isn’t fun. The fever, aches, chills, cough and cold symptoms are unpleasant to say the least. Navy Medicine wants to urge everyone to be ready for flu season this year. The actions you take now can help prevent you from getting this dangerous disease. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) influenza is …

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Exercising to Relieve Stress

By Cmdr. John Brooks, M.D., Lovell Federal Health Care Center The physical benefits of exercise have long been established. Exercise is known to improve physical fitness, help manage weight, and reduce stress. The most recent federal guidelines for adults by the Department of Health and Human Services recommend at least 2½ hours of moderate-intensity physical activity (e.g. brisk walking) each …

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