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The Importance of Suicide Prevention

By Master Chief Hospital Corpsman Laura Martinez, Force Master Chief and director, U.S. Navy Hospital Corps, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) Across all services September is recognized as Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month. While suicide numbers in the military tend to be lower than their civilian counterparts, suicides within all branches have increased. This disconcerting trend has prompted leaders …

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Psychological Health and the Military Family

By Kirsten Woodward, LCSW, BUMED Director Family Programs Division The other day I was having a discussion with some colleagues, both within the Navy and in the academic community about some of the aspects of care we provide. Some of my colleagues said they are mental health providers and some stated they are behavioral health providers, but none mentioned the …

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Leaving Kandahar is a Bittersweet Feeling

By U.S. Navy Capt. Mike McCarten, former commanding officer of the NATO Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit, Kandahar, Afghanistan. McCarten is a family physician and aerospace medicine specialist. The old saying that war is hell is true, and those of us at the NATO Role 3 Hospital in Kandahar needed no convincing of that. Our job was to deal with …

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Navy Medical Researchers Move Close to an Effective Malaria Vaccine

By Capt. Judith Epstein,medical researcher, U.S. Naval Medical Research Center & U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program Everyone is familiar with the idea that when Navy personnel and their families deploy to regions where malaria is endemic, they are at risk of developing infection with this life-threatening disease.  In fact, more person-days have been lost among U.S. military personnel due to malaria than …

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We Need to Cut Back on the Salt

  By U.S. Navy Capt. Joseph McQuade, Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Health Director Whenever I see a patient in clinic, one thing I always look at is blood pressure. In my opinion, hypertension, or high blood pressure, has become a “neglected” disease in this country. It causes one in six deaths among American adults — a rate that rose 25 …

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