Tag Archives: Hospital Corpsmen

Gassed! Navy Medicine and the poison gas threat of World War I

By André B. Sobocinski Historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery At 0400 on April 13, 1918 shouts of “Gas attack!” could be heard across Camp Fontaine-St. Robert in the Verdun Sector of France.  Located two miles from the front, this wooden hollow served as the makeshift quarters for 300 Marines and Sailors of the 74th Company, 6th Marine …

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A Message from the Navy Surgeon General: Professional Behavior

The following message was sent by Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Forrest Faison to Navy Medicine commanders world-wide. Shipmates: It has come to my attention that members of the Navy Medicine team posted highly offensive photos and videos on their personal social media pages involving newborns at our naval hospitals. This content was then shared on various platforms and has …

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Hospital Corpsman #ThankfulFor Small Acts of Kindness

Editor’s note: On November 26, Good Morning America featured Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (HM2) Shannon Thompson as part of its “Thankful Happens Here” series celebrating military heroes, their families and community members who made a lasting impact. Here is HM2 Thompson’s story.   I was raised to be nice to everyone. As my parents always said, “kill ‘em with kindness.”  I …

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A Look Back: Navy Medicine in 1913

By Andre Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Much has changed over the past 100 years in not only the United States, but in Navy Medicine as well.  Here’s a look back 100 years ago.  In 1913, the U.S. population had reached 97,225,000 and stretched across 48 states with the additions of Arizona and New Mexico into the Union. …

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