Tag Archives: hospital corpsman

What does Navy Medicine readiness look like? Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Ashley Raynor.

By Regena Kowitz Navy Medicine West Public Affairs When Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Ashley Raynor was headed home from work on Feb. 23, southbound on California’s Interstate 5 alongside the Pacific Ocean, the last thing she expected was to be one of the first people to arrive at the scene of an accident. When traffic came to a sudden halt, …

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Naval Hospital Bremerton Sailor prepares Hospital Corpsmen for combat trauma

By Douglas H. Stutz Naval Hospital Bremerton Public Affairs For many hospital corpsmen, working in a war zone setting is a deployment reality. Real-world experience helps train them to work in these challenging trauma environments. Naval Hospital Bremerton’s Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Darrius A. Cooley was one of eight instructors teaching and supervising 15 corpsmen from mid-April to June 1, …

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In their own words: Sailors discuss what it means to be a U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman

This Sunday, June 17, marks the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the U.S. Navy Hospital Corps. Provisions in an act of Congress created the Hospital Corps as an organized unit of the Medical Department, and established the Hospital Steward, Hospital Apprentice First Class, Hospital Apprentice, and the warrant rank of pharmacist. Under the act, the Secretary of the Navy appointed 25 …

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What’s in a name: USS Litchfield (DD-336) and her namesake hospital corpsman

By André B. Sobocinski Historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery For as long as there has been a U.S. Navy, ships have been named after military heroes, politicians, and individuals who have made important contributions to the service.1 USS Litchfield (DD-336) is one of hundreds of ships to follow this practice. But unlike those commissioned before or after, …

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The Saga of the Northcotts: Three Brothers at Bilibid Prison

By André B. Sobocinski Historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery In the annals of naval history, perhaps there are no more famous siblings than the Sullivans—five brothers whose lives were lost aboard USS Juneau (CL-52) at Guadalcanal in 1942. Less well-known are the Northcott brothers—John (b. 1918), Robert (b.1920) and Thomas (b.1921)—three seamen apprentices-turned hospital corpsmen who miraculously …

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