A Look Back

Supporting the “The Right Stuff”: Looking Back at the Navy Medical Department and the Mercury Space Program

Part I: The Johnsville Human Centrifuge By André B. Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery “Here is a multimillion-dollar unique device developed by the Navy, but of such capability that it has received worldwide attention. It has been employed and will be employed as a tool for solving problems of interest to not only the Navy but …

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A Starting Line for SPRINT: The Beginning of the Navy’s Special Psychiatric Rapid Intervention Team

By Andre’ B. Sobocinski, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery historian The special psychiatric rapid intervention team (SPRINT) is marking four decades since it was first developed by a team of psychiatrists at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Virginia. Early in 1976, psychiatrists involved with the care of survivors from USS Belknap accident began seeing an incidence of marital problems, …

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Polio and the Advent of Dependent Care in the U.S. Navy

By André B. Sobocinski, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery historian “No disease drew as much attention, or struck the same terror, as polio, and for good reason. Polio hit without warning. There was no way of telling who would get it and who would be spared. It killed some of its victims and marked others for life, leaving …

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The Surgeon General of the U.S. Navy: A Statistical and Biographical Retrospective, Part III

By André B. Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Navy surgeons general have been a well-published lot over the years. Their literary output includes textbooks, articles, clinical studies, histories, memoirs, travelogues and even one epic poem. Surgeon William P.C. Barton was one of most published BUMED chiefs since 1842.  Over the course of his career, Barton authored …

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The Surgeon General of the U.S. Navy: A Statistical and Biographical Retrospective, Part II

By André B. Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. History tells us that the position of deputy Navy surgeon general has not automatically led to selection as Navy surgeon general.  Vice Adm. Faison is the eleventh of 66 (or 17 percent) deputy surgeons general to have been promoted to the highest office in Navy Medicine.  Of these …

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