Navy History

10 Notable Moments for Women in Navy Medicine

Editor’s note: Although this blog honors several individuals, there are thousands of remarkable women who contribute to the Navy Medicine mission and continue to make an impact every day. 1942: Navy nurse superintendent Sue Dauser is the first woman in the Navy to serve as a captain. She received her commission in the Navy on Oct. 16, 1917.   Feb. 1, 1943: First female hospital …

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Remembering the War Dispensary, the Forerunner of Naval Medical Center San Diego

By André B. Sobocinski, historian, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Editor’s note: 2017 marks the centennial of Navy Medicine in San Diego. The following blog commemorates this historical milestone. One-hundred years ago, the U.S. Navy moved to the vacated grounds of the Panama-California Exposition in Balboa Park to establish a training camp for Sailors destined for the “Great War.”(1) Amidst …

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Five Facts about African-Americans in Navy Medicine

By Andre Sobocinski, Historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery African-Americans were among the first Sailors to serve as loblolly boys (precursors of today’s hospital corpsmen). Among these first medical Sailors was Joseph Anderson, a 16-year-old loblolly boy who served aboard the schooner USS Eagle in 1800.   On  July 26, 1943 the first class of African-Americans entered Hospital …

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A Starting Line for SPRINT: The Beginning of the Navy’s Special Psychiatric Rapid Intervention Team

By Andre’ B. Sobocinski, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery historian The special psychiatric rapid intervention team (SPRINT) is marking four decades since it was first developed by a team of psychiatrists at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Virginia. Early in 1976, psychiatrists involved with the care of survivors from USS Belknap accident began seeing an incidence of marital problems, …

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The Surgeon General of the U.S. Navy: A Statistical and Biographical Retrospective, Part III

By André B. Sobocinski, historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Navy surgeons general have been a well-published lot over the years. Their literary output includes textbooks, articles, clinical studies, histories, memoirs, travelogues and even one epic poem. Surgeon William P.C. Barton was one of most published BUMED chiefs since 1842.  Over the course of his career, Barton authored …

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