Navy History

Remembering Navy Medicine at Normandy

By André B. Sobocinski, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery historian On September 27, 2012, Dr. Lee Parker the last surviving Navy physician from the Normandy Invasion died at the age of 95.(1) With his death the public was again reminded that Navy Medicine played an unsung role on June 6th, 1944 in what Gen. Dwight Eisenhower termed the …

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Navy Medical Heroes of Midway

By Andre Sobocinski, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery historian June 4, 2017 marks the 75th anniversary of arguably, the most pivotal naval battle in his­tory. The one-day battle re­versed the tide of World War II in the Pacific, six months after Pearl Harbor. Following the Battle of Midway, Japanese Imperial Forces were on the defensive for the remainder …

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10 Notable Moments for Women in Navy Medicine

Editor’s note: Although this blog honors several individuals, there are thousands of remarkable women who contribute to the Navy Medicine mission and continue to make an impact every day. 1942: Navy nurse superintendent Sue Dauser is the first woman in the Navy to serve as a captain. She received her commission in the Navy on Oct. 16, 1917.   Feb. 1, 1943: First female hospital …

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Remembering the War Dispensary, the Forerunner of Naval Medical Center San Diego

By André B. Sobocinski, historian, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Editor’s note: 2017 marks the centennial of Navy Medicine in San Diego. The following blog commemorates this historical milestone. One-hundred years ago, the U.S. Navy moved to the vacated grounds of the Panama-California Exposition in Balboa Park to establish a training camp for Sailors destined for the “Great War.”(1) Amidst …

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Five Facts about African-Americans in Navy Medicine

By Andre Sobocinski, Historian, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery African-Americans were among the first Sailors to serve as loblolly boys (precursors of today’s hospital corpsmen). Among these first medical Sailors was Joseph Anderson, a 16-year-old loblolly boy who served aboard the schooner USS Eagle in 1800.   On  July 26, 1943 the first class of African-Americans entered Hospital …

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